Here’s Why NFL Players Don’t Get to Plead “Free Speech”

Employment expert explains why employees should tread lightly when discussing politics

Wilson points to the recent termination of Google employee James Damore, who was given the ax because of an email ‘manifesto’ which became public. “Damore offended many people with his views about women and gender equality, and he ended up being terminated as a result,” says Wilson. “For many people, this was seen as an affront to free speech. Now, this issue is coming to light again in the NFL. Should players be punished for expressing their beliefs, or are employers within their rights to demand that they stand for the anthem or face termination as a result?”

The employment trends expert argues that the NFL owners could have a case for terminating their players’ contracts if the behavior can be proved to have a negative impact on their bottom line. “NFL ratings are down, as President Trump himself declared,” says Wilson. “If employers feel that the players’ protests is impacting their business, they will be within their rights to boot the player off the field. In fact, the contracts which players sign give owners plenty of leeway to fire them for any behavior they deem unbecoming, both on and off the field.”

In other words, says Wilson, the First Amendment cannot protect someone who has signed a contract promising to behave in accordance with their employer’s values. “For the average American, this means that your expression of free speech can come back and haunt you, whether it’s something you post on Facebook or a political discussion you have in the break room. If your employer has set forth certain points of decorum which you have agreed to, you can’t break those rules without consequence, whether you’re a server wearing a ‘Black Lives Matter’ pin or a lawyer making sexist jokes online.”

For more on this topic, please contact Rob Wilson at

Above-Average Rise in Cost of Employee Benefits in 2018

How can employers prepare?

Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA and group insurance expert, says, “Employees say that an employer’s health insurance plan is more important to them than their actual salary, but as these numbers show, offering group insurance can be a losing game for employers. For the last five years, employer costs to insure each employee have risen, but now we are looking at a significant bump: 5  percent or more.”

Wilson points to the fact that Republicans have not yet been able to eradicate the Affordable Care Act, as well as the fact that specialty prescription drug costs are skyrocketing.

“Employers may consider enrolling in high-deductible CDHPs as these plans can help to protect your bottom line. Other cost-saving measures like instituting a surcharge for spouses or employees who smoke can slow cost. Outcome based incentives and wellness programs have also been shown to be useful, as have on-site clinics and prescription purchasing coalitions. Some companies are instilling a policy that requires mandatory generic brand medication,  which can help to reduce costs in a meaningful way.”

For more on this topic, please contact Rob Wilson at

Here’s Why Unemployment Is Better Than Poor Employment

Employment expert explains why job-seekers should avoid ‘stopgap’ positions

When looking for work, many job-seekers often assume that any job is better than no job. Hence, they take any employment offers that come their way, even if the duties are below their experience level or the pay is not ideal. However, new research shows that this could be a very bad idea.

Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA and employment trends expert, says, “A new study published in the International Journal of Epidemiology found that low-paying, poor-quality jobs have more of a devastating impact on a person’s physical health and emotional well-being than having no job at all.”

Other studies have also shown that ‘stopgap’ jobs are also a bad idea for your career success as well. “A study published in the National Bureau of Economic Research found that employers were much more likely to offer a position to a person who was unemployed, but had experience in the field, as opposed to a person who was employed in a lesser position that required less experience and expertise,” explains Wilson.

However, while taking a poor-quality, “stopgap” job can have a negative impact on your health and your job hunting prospects, Wilson cautions that this does not mean that applicants should refuse to consider any temporary work.

“This study illustrates that employers are looking for one thing: experience that is relative to the job. Hence, if you want to achieve your dream career, you should not accept jobs that aren’t going to offer you that valuable experience,” says Wilson. “That is why temporary work and staffing agencies can be invaluable. They can cater your job search to your very specific career goals, which means you won’t have to worry about making a misstep which can haunt you for years to come.”

For more on this topic, please contact Rob Wilson at

The Jim Fannin Show, Podcast

Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA, was recently a guest on Jim Fannin’s weekly podcast, The Jim Fannin Show. Jim Fannin is the World’s #1 Coach of Champions & America’s ZoneCoach, with over 40 years of coaching experience. Each week, Jim focuses the show on the peak performance mindset called the Zone.

“On this episode, Rob shares his story of coincidentally meeting Jim Fannin on a golf course in a torrential rainstorm when he was at a mental crossroad of balancing his work, family and overall life. It was this life-changing encounter that resulted in Jim training Rob to attract the Zone in all facets of his life.”

Read more and listen now:

Should Employers Be Allowed to Read Your Email?

Employment trends expert weighs in

The European Court of Human Rights just overturned a previous ruling which had given employers unfettered access to their employees’ emails and workplace communications. The decision is once again sparking discussion about American privacy laws and the ways in which employers are able to freely access all of an employee’s communications.

“Privacy is considered to be of great importance in Europe,” says Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA and employment trends expert. “Hence, there was a great outcry when the court originally decided to green-light the law which would allow employers free rein to read their employees’ emails and messages.”

Wilson says that the overturning of the law has reignited workplace privacy discussions in the States. “This is an issue that is of growing concern as many employers are now using apps to track their remote employees’ productivity. For example, apps that take screenshots of an employee’s computer or apps that track what sites an employee visits and how long they stay there. As we enter this new world of a largely remote workforce, issues of privacy are going to be of growing concern.”

For now, Wilson says that employers should cover all their bases by making sure to alert employees that any and all workplace communication is not considered private. “Your employees should be fairly warned that any messages they send on company property are able to be accessed and viewed by you. Privacy isn’t a right afforded to employees who are using their work computers to hang out on Facebook or write personal messages to coworkers.”

For more on this topic, please contact Rob Wilson at