How to Secure Top Talent in a Tight Job Market

Employment expert explains how your company can shine as an outstanding employer

JobsThe national unemployment rate is just 3.7%. In August, 130,000 new jobs were created.

“The number of Americans who are currently employed is at a high of 157.9 million,” says Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA and employment expert. “Labor force participation has not been this high since August 2013. While this is great news for employers, it means that companies need to work harder to stand out to prospective hires.”

“Working with an employment solutions firm such as Employco USA is a wise way to stand out from the pack,” continues Wilson. “Not only will this help increase the number of candidates you reach and help streamline your hiring procedures, but a human resources firm can also help you to establish a robust benefits package.”

From an economic standpoint, you need to think in terms not only of salary and health insurance, but also a total compensation package, says Wilson.

“There are many benefits which today’s employees are looking for, including whether you match a 401(k), what is the value of the paid time off offered, along with medical, dental, vision, and life insurance” he explains.

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What Employers Can Learn from the Mississippi Raids

Employment expert Rob Wilson discusses how companies can safeguard their staff

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)Last month, ICE officials detained hundreds of undocumented workers in Mississippi. When the raids (which took place in 7 different cities and 6 different work sites) were complete, 680 employees were in the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials.

As the debate over illegal immigration rages on, the Mississippi raids also raise an important concern for companies. How much blame do hiring managers and employers hold when it comes to using undocumented people for labor? Is this just a public relations nightmare and staffing disaster for companies, or can charges be levied against these employers?

“The answer is yes, to put it simply,” says Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA and employment expert. “It is illegal not only to hire an undocumented person, but also to recruit them or refer them to another employer. Employers who knowingly do so and are shown to have a ‘pattern and practice’ of hiring undocumented workers can be fined $3,000 per worker and even face potential jail time.”

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Salary History Ban Expands to Illinois Employers

Employment expert explains why Illinois employees can’t be asked about their past salaries any longer

SalaryEmployers in Illinois will be required to make changes to their hiring practices in the near future. Starting September 29th, it will become illegal for employers to ask prospective employees to share their salary history.

“Currently, 17 states and 19 localities have banned questions about salary history during the application process, and Illinois will be joining these ranks shortly. Several states like Alabama have banned these application questions for all potential employees, and other states like California go so far as to require employers to provide pay scale information if employees request it,” says Rob Wilson, employment trends expert and President of Employco USA.

Wilson says that many experts agree that salary history questions can lead to income inequality for women and minorities.

“The belief is that inquiring about salary history can create a vicious cycle in which women are paid less presently and in the future, simply because they were paid less in the past,” explains Wilson. “Concerned civil rights activists point to the fact that women are offered less when compared to similarly trained and educated males, even when these interviewees are coming right out of college.”

So, what should employers consider moving forward?

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By 2030, 20 Million Workers Will Lose Their Jobs to Robots

Employment expert discusses breaking new study which spells disaster for manufacturing employees

RobotA new study from analysis firm Oxford Economics predicts that by 2030, over 20 million workers in the manufacturing industry will lose their jobs to robots.

“As machines become cheaper to build and artificial intelligence technology becomes more comprehensive and affordable, many industries are going to become robot-centric,” says Rob Wilson. “Just look at the automotive industry: Starting in the 1980s, companies were spending billions of dollars to create robots to perform basic tasks in their automobile factories. Now, 43 percent of the world’s robots are used by the automotive industry. We should expect to see a similar trend in manufacturing as well, although the good news is that robots create jobs in some fields even as they take them away in others.”

Wilson cautions that battles over minimum wage could increase the application of artificial intelligence in some industries, especially as it relates to entry-level, unskilled work.

“Findings show that fast-food workers could be at serious risk of losing their jobs to robots in the next several years. One study found that each new robot added per 1,000 workers causes wages to drop in the surrounding area by around 0.25 and 0.5 percent,” says Wilson. “We can clearly see that in specific industries, the impact of automation can not only impact job numbers, but also a worker’s wages.”

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(Article) “How AI Is Transforming HR With More Sophisticated, Less Biased Recruiting”

Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA, was recently quoted in an article for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s digital publication CO:

How AI Is Transforming HR With More Sophisticated, Less Biased Recruiting“Artificial intelligence is driven by algorithms — sets of rules based in part on historical data that computers use to guide decisions. For example, if history shows that employees possessing specific traits have proven successful in a given job role, AI algorithms rank highly applicants with those same attributes.

While AI automates mundane tasks, it’s the greater power of AI that gives HR pause. Employers know they are prohibited from asking applicants about marital status and religion, but if AI teases out that information indirectly, without consent, companies run the risk of violating discrimination laws.

“There are still a lot of bugs. One bug is discrimination. There are examples where women and older applicants have been weeded out,” said Rob Wilson, president, Employco USA, an HR outsourcer.”

Follow the link to read more:

CO by U.S. Chamber of Commerce

For more on this topic, please contact Rob Wilson at rwilson@thewilsoncompanies.com.

The Myth of the Summer Job: Why This American Tradition is Disappearing

Employment expert explains why most teens won’t be working the hot-dog stand this summer

Summer JobsA Pew study recently revealed that the number of teens with summer jobs has been on a steady decline for the last 2 decades. While almost half of American teenagers used to spend their summers scooping ice cream, slinging burgers, or working at the mall, now only around one-third of teens will spend their summer months employed.

“It’s not just that teens don’t necessarily want to find summer employment, but that the employment opportunities themselves have changed,” says Rob Wilson, employment expert and President of Employco USA, a national employment solutions firm. “There are less entry-level jobs available for these unskilled workers, and with new robotic technology at fast-food restaurants and fast-casual chains, these young would-be workers are being automated out of employment.”

Wilson also points to disappearing American malls.

“When so-called ‘anchor’ stores such as Sears or JCPenney close down, it becomes very problematic for the mall as a whole,” explains Wilson of Employco USA. “Filling that retail space is very difficult, and with giants like Sears experiencing a major decline, that means that many malls across the country are going to be left with huge vacancies. This puts all the stores within the mall at major risk, from your kiosks to your pretzel stands to your small clothing stores.”

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How A.I. is Revolutionizing the Hiring Process

Employment trend expert explains how robots are the new recruiters

RobotThe interview process is always nerve-wracking for job hunters, but now instead of facing a hiring manager, applicants might find themselves dealing with artificial intelligence agents before finally meeting a real person from their desired firm.

“Artificial intelligence has been a hot-button topic when it comes to how robots could replace minimum wage workers in fast-food environments and beyond,” says employment trends expert Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA, a national employment solutions firm. “But there is another piece to this puzzle, which is the way in which companies are now using A.I. to simplify and streamline their recruiting and hiring process. For example, beauty giant L’oreal uses chatbot Mya to interview applicants in the first stage of sorting through candidates.”

Meanwhile, JPMorgan Chase & Co. is using technology from New York City-based tech startup Pymetrics in which job applicants are tested with fast-paced decision-making games in order to see if they have a chance to earn a spot at the investment firm.

However, some critics say that these artificial intelligence measures could pose legal concerns in the future.

“Just last year it was discovered that Amazon’s latest A.I. hiring bot was discriminatory against women,” says Wilson. “And others say that these measures such as the Pymetrics hiring games will be discriminatory against those with learning differences or those who are older and have less technological skill.”

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House Votes to ‘Ban the Box’: Gov. Agencies Can No Longer Inquire about Criminal History on Job Applications

Human resources expert explains the impact of the Fair Chance Act on employers outside the gov. realm 

Job ApplicationLast week the House Oversight and Reform Committee passed a bill which would effectively “ban the box” that would keep federal agencies and contractors from asking potential employees’ about their past criminal history, until after these applicants had been offered a conditional employment offer.

Known as the “Fair Chance Act,” the measure is meant to help previously incarcerated individuals increase their ability to rebuild their life post-conviction.

But what does this mean for employers?

“Currently, this legislation only prohibits federal agencies from including a criminal history box on their application and from asking these questions in interviews before a conditional job offer is made,” says Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA and human resources expert. “However, ten states (and the District of Columbia) have ban-the-box laws that apply to private employers— including California, Illinois, Hawaii, and New Jersey, and other companies such as Target have banned the box across state lines at all of their locations.”

Wilson says this number will likely continue to grow, but he explains that banning the box doesn’t mean that employers have no rights when it comes to establishing a person’s character and mental health.

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‘Entitled’ Millennials May Have the Right Idea

Employment expert explains how younger workers are demanding more from bosses – and getting it

MillennialsMillennials often get criticized for having an ‘entitled’ attitude, and this appears to hold true in the workplace as well. Recent reports reflect that younger workers do appear to demand more than their older counterparts.

“Previous generations used to be happy to have a steady paycheck and a gold watch upon retirement,” says Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA. “But younger workers don’t approach employment the same way. Research shows that Millennials change jobs more frequently than previous generations, and they also have a lower opinion of corporations. In other words, they don’t want to commit years at companies which they see as purely self-interested.”

Wilson says that employers would be wise not to give up hope when it comes to engaging and retaining younger workers.

“Yes, these workers are more prone to dissatisfaction and more apt to leave jobs that don’t make them happy, but research shows that when companies approach Millennials as individuals and try to appeal to them on their own level, they do so with great results.”

When Millennials are engaged by their employers, and companies make an effort to reach out to the younger generation in the workplace, they see a vast improvement in both agility and innovation.

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New Study Reveals the Costly Woes of On-Boarding New Staff

Human resources expert reveals why so many companies struggle to keep new employees – and how to change that

Employee quitA new study found that over 20 percent of people quit their new positions within the first 6 weeks of joining a company. Furthermore, the new research from Robert Half found that 93 percent of new employees consider leaving their jobs before the end of their probationary period.

“The results found that 36 percent of people leave their jobs due to issues with ‘onboarding,’” says Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA and employee engagement expert. “Yet many firms neglect to put much effort into acclimating their employees to their positions.”

Losing a new employee can be a financial hardship, thanks to the cost of recruiting and training employees, and it also creates a workplace that feels unstable and tense for existing employees.

“A revolving door of employees is a problem for a number of reasons,” says Wilson. “It increases the risk of fraud and other crimes, but it also makes employees feel as though newcomers aren’t going to stick around long…ergo they aren’t very welcoming or very thorough in their training, as they figure it’s a waste of time.”

Wilson also points to the fact that searching for employees is very time-consuming and leaves other important tasks unfinished. “A human resources team who is constantly focusing on finding new employees is doing so at the cost of caring for the needs of existing employees.”

So, what should companies do in order to ensure that their new employees stick around for the long haul?

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