Improving Job Market Means Employees Have Options: Don’t Let Your Top Talent Get Poached

Employment expert shares “The Three E’s” which will keep employees happy and hard-working

Leaving EmployeeAs the job market improves, so too does employers’ risk of losing employees. It is estimated that around 60 percent of employees are either actively or passively searching for a new job, or they are being approached by other companies who want to ‘poach’ them for their own team.

Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA and employment trends expert says, “Losing an employee is a serious financial blow. It will cost you about 6-9 months of salary to replace a salaried employee, and this does not even include the soft-dollar cost of lost knowledge. This includes technical and institutional knowledge as well as lost productivity as other employees have to pick up the missing employee’s slack, which can in turn cause lower morale, lower employee engagement and other financial concerns.”

Wilson says that employers would well to remember the three E’s (economics, employee engagement, and environment) when it comes to attracting and retaining top talent.

“From an economic standpoint, you need to think in terms not only of salary and health insurance, but also a total compensation package,” says Wilson. “There are many benefits which today’s employees are looking for, including whether you match a 401k, what is the value of the paid time off offered, along with medical, dental, vision and life insurance.”

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Survey: Employers Open to Hiring People with Criminal Backgrounds

H.R. expert explains why the corporate opinion on criminal backgrounds is changing, and what it means for employers

Criminal Background CheckA recent survey of Illinois employers found that companies are more open to hiring those with a criminal past than ever before.

Additionally, many states are changing previous regulations which prevented convicted criminals from working in certain fields.

“In Illinois, for example, lawmakers have made 100 occupations newly available for those with a criminal background, such as jobs in real estate and accounting,” says Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA, a national employment-solutions firm. “With these legal stipulations out of the way, many employers are looking at such candidates in a new light.”

But, is it wise for employers to take such a risk?

“When it comes to criminal backgrounds, you really have to be judicious in considering what the offense was, how long ago the crime occurred, as well as what position you are hiring the candidate for,” says Wilson. “Clearly, hiring someone with a string of drug offenses to work in a pharmacy environment or veterinary clinic could be problematic, but alternately, a person in recovery could thrive in other positions such as customer service or data entry.”

Wilson says that there is no guarantees when hiring an employee, even those without a criminal background.

“It’s easy to assume that just because a person has a criminal background, they should be avoided or looked at suspiciously, but if the crimes were in the past and they have paid their debt to society, then it is possible to consider that these people may be excellent candidates for employment,” says Wilson. “Yet proceed with caution, we recommend all employers conduct a criminal background screen prior to hiring an employee – and, make sure you are well-versed in what the crime was and what that could mean for your company.”

For more on this topic, please contact Rob Wilson at rwilson@thewilsoncompanies.com.

New Study: Employees Won’t Commit to Companies Anymore…Unless They Offer Flexible Work Options

Employment trends expert explains how to retain talent in a competitive market driven by agile employment demands 

FlexWorkAs the economy strengthens and jobs’ numbers improve, employees now have more options and bargaining power than in recent memory. However, a new Emerging Workforce® Study suggests that these new options are changing the way employees consider possible job opportunities, and in turn changing the way that employers attract and retain staff.

“The new research shows that the number of contingent workers has increased by 14 percent since 2017,” says Rob Wilson, employment trends expert and President of Employco USA, a national employment-solutions firm that is renowned for their impeccable service and forward-thinking practices. “Additionally, over 40 percent of employees say they will only work for a company which offers such freelance or work-from-home options.”

Known as “agile employment,” Wilson explains that employees are looking for more control over their work lives and they expect companies to adequately respect those needs and offer such opportunities.

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What Employers Need to Know About Fall Internships

H.R. expert explains how companies should approach hiring student interns

With fall approaching and school commencing, many college students will be considering a fall internship. However, companies who are considering hiring student interns need to be careful about how they proceed with this arrangement.

Internships“Interns can no longer be used as free labor,” says Rob Wilson, human resources expert and President of Employco USA, an employment solutions firm. “It is crucial that the intern can be shown to benefit as much from the arrangement as the company itself.”

Wilson explains that companies who are considering interns should consider not only how these workers would benefit them, but how the experience itself can benefit the intern. “Students will need to be able to prove that their time with your firm is educational and applicable to their chosen major,” says the H.R. expert.

Furthermore, says Wilson, companies will need to budget for these interns.

“The days of free internships are pretty much over,” says Wilson. “There is a very thin margin of internships where it is still okay for a worker to receive no financial compensation, but we advise all of our clients to pay their interns. It’s a good business practice and one that will be beneficial for you in the long run.”

Wilson also says that hiring interns will bring a fresh perspective and a new outlook to companies.

“When you bring the next generation into your workplace, you are going to enjoy the benefit of their unique outlook and fresh take on issues in your industry,” says Wilson. “Student interns should be a win-win for both you and them, provided you take the needed steps to make sure the program is run effectively and managed well.”

For more on this topic, you can listen to Employco USA’s HR Podcast entitled, “Company Internship Programs.”

Internship Programs

Contact us with any questions you may have, we’re here to help: hr@employco.com

Podcast: Company Internship Programs

Rob, Scott, and Jason discuss company internship programs along with special guests Griffen and Pat – who both just completed their own internships over the summer. They touch on the do’s and don’ts, along with: goals, valuable feedback, and the significant benefits involved for both the intern as well as the employer.

Internship Programs

Contact us with any questions you may have, we’re here to help: hr@employco.com

Companies Commit to Hire Workers with Autism, but is the Workplace Autism-Friendly?

Employment expert explains what adaptations employers should make for employees with autism

Companies like SAP and Microsoft have recently made a committed effort to start hiring employees who fall on the autism spectrum. This is timely, as more people than ever are being diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Although varying in degree, individuals with ASD can require several modifications to the workplace. However, 80 percent of people with autism struggle to find employment, likely because employers are not well-versed in this condition and how to manage it in the workplace.

DeskRob Wilson, President of Employco USA says, “It’s important to become educated about these conditions and to realize that some people genuinely do need to have modifications made to their workplaces to be successful at their duties. Just as we do not hesitate to make handicap-accessible restrooms, we should similarly be willing to work with those who have developmental disorders.”

Wilson says that hiring staff with ASD can be incredibly beneficial for your company.Experts theorize that if great thinkers like Einstein and Newton were alive today, they would be diagnosed with ASD.  No wonder corporations like Microsoft and Walgreens are going out of their way to seek job candidates with autism. These firms realize that autism has amazingly powerful advantages: People with autism tend to be highly intelligent and highly focused workers, along with loyal employees,” he says.

Here, Wilson outlines steps that companies should take to make their workplaces ASD-friendly:

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Is America Really Near Full Employment?

Employment expert weighs in on the truth behind latest jobs numbers

JobsThe latest jobs report has many people talking about “full employment” and the fact that America is allegedly near this state. However, what does full employment really mean, and is our nation truly almost to this place?

Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA and employment trends expert says, “The fact is that we are not at full employment yet.  We’ll know if we are approaching full employment when inflation starts to really pick up, which I expect to see within the next 6-9 months.  At that time, I believe the Fed will answer with more dramatic rate increases and we’ll virtually reach full employment.”

Wilson says that experts who are calling this ‘full employment’ are speaking too soon due to our rocky economic history.

“Normally, the general rule-of-thumb full employment indicator of around 4.5% can’t be relied upon right now.  We’re still in uncharted waters coming out of the freakish recession and the new tariffs, which means the economic and employment industries are struggling with accurate predictions,” says Wilson.

However, Wilson says that the jobs’ report is very good news, and right on track with what employers in this nation say they are experiencing.

“In talking to our clients, even though we’re not quite at the full employment level yet, employers are still having a difficult time finding good quality candidates for their open positions.  We haven’t seen significant wage growth that typically accompanies low unemployment rates, but I think that’s next on the horizon,” says Wilson. “We need to be careful to keep rapid wage growth under control, otherwise, the U.S. might face a brand-new set of problems that will be very tough to overcome.”

For more on this topic, please contact Rob Wilson at rwilson@thewilsoncompanies.com.

The Illegal Questions Employers Ask on Job Interviews

Employment expert weighs in on the most common illegal questions interviewees face

InterviewPrevious research has revealed that in 1 in 5 employers have asked illegal questions during interviews. And, a recent study led by The Associated Press and CNBC found that many job interview candidates say that they have still been asked inappropriate (and illegal) questions about things such as their age and intention to have children.

Rob Wilson, human resources expert and President of Employco USA (a Chicago-based employment solutions firm), says, “The reality is that many employers and hiring managers are asking questions that are either blatantly illegal or just hovering near that line. Yet I think it’s important to note that these people are not willfully thumbing their nose at the law, but that they lack the training and the knowledge required to handle interviews in a professional and ethical manner.”

Not to mention, says Wilson, the laws which regulate job interview questions are ever-changing. Questions which used to be considered par-for-the-course, such as questions about a person’s criminal background, could soon be against the law.

“People in many states are working to keep questions about an interview candidate’s criminal history out of the job interview process all together,” says Wilson. “They view these questions as discriminatory and depending on where you live, questions about a person’s criminal background have already been removed from job applications.”

So, what other questions are off the table when it comes to a job interview?

Wilson says, “Questions about a person’s age and marital status are no-go’s. And, while you can ask about any vacations or traveling plans a person has in the future, you cannot ask about their intention to have children…even if you see a visible baby bump! Additionally, you cannot inquire about a person’s religious or political beliefs.”

Employment expert Rob Wilson also adds that in many cases, asking about a person’s salary history could also be frowned upon. “There is a movement to remove questions about salary history from the interview process. Proponents say that this could help to repair the gender pay gap as well as racial pay gaps.”

For more on this topic, please contact Rob Wilson at rwilson@thewilsoncompanies.com.

Why So Many Americans Are “Ghosting” Employers

Employment experts talks new trend and how it’s impacting the hiring process

Ghosting“Ghosting” (when a person ends a relationship with no communication or forewarning) has been a hot-button topic in the dating community for years, but now the word is being used in employment circles to describe a new and troubling trend of job applicants who simply disappear off an employer’s radar.

“Ghosting isn’t just for Tinder users anymore,” says Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA and employment trends expert. “It seems that our booming jobs economy has led to applicants who simply ‘disappear’ during the interview process. According to LinkedIn, many employers now say that the tides have turned on them…instead of applicants desperately hoping to get a call-back, hiring teams themselves now find themselves dealing with unanswered calls and candidates who suddenly go MIA without warning.”

Wilson says that the problem is such that some companies have even instituted changes to their hiring process, including putting multiple conditions on job offers. He also adds, “Instead of narrowing it down to just 1-2 qualified applicants and cutting everyone else loose, companies are now wisely holding onto all possibilities before assuming that their search is over. With so many job openings, applicants can now play fast and loose with opportunities, and sadly many of these applicants take the coward’s way out and simply disappear without any further communication.”

Along with this growing trend of ghosting job opportunities, Wilson says that many employees are now quitting their posts in droves. “According to the  Bureau of Labor Statistics, the amount of employees who have voluntarily left their jobs is almost DOUBLE that of the number of employees who were fired. And, in March of this year, 3 million Americans quit their jobs out of their own volition.”

While Wilson says it is wonderful that so many jobs are opening up and Americans now feel safe to quit their positions or seek new opportunities, he cautions that ‘ghosting’ possible employers is in very bad form and could come back to bite you in the future.

“Even if you decide you do not want to work with a company, it is a bad idea to just cease communication without giving the employer any idea of what is going on,” says Wilson. “You never know when you could wind up looking for a job again, or when you could find yourself at an industry event or networking dinner with that same hiring agent. It’s always best to treat people the way you would want to be treated, even in the hiring process.”

For more on this topic, please contact Rob Wilson at rwilson@thewilsoncompanies.com.

Update: This blog post was quoted by Benefits Pro in an 07/13/18 article, read more here:
https://biv.com/article/2018/07/one-five-bosses-are-judging-their-employees-taking-lunch-breaks-study

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