Can Teachers Be Punished for School Walk-Outs?

Employment/human resources expert talks freedom of speech in the workplace

ClassroomIn the wake of numerous school walk-outs across the country, many students as well as teachers are facing potential consequences for their decision to express their beliefs about the Second Amendment. This begs the question: How much free speech is truly allowed in the workplace, and can you get in trouble for expressing anger about gun control or our President or anything in between?

Rob Wilson, President of Employco USA and H.R. expert says, “In today’s acrimonious political climate, an employee’s right to free speech is a very important topic. Managers around the country need to become aware of what speech is legally protected in the workplace and what steps they should take to tighten up policies regarding political discourse in the office.”

Here, Wilson outlines what employers and employees need to know:

  • Employees’ rights are quite limited. Wilson says, “Unless you work for a state or federal employer, you do not have legal protections when it comes to expressing your views. Whether you are pro-Trump or pro-gun control, if you work for a private employer, you are not promised the right to share your views without impunity.”
  • Few states make it illegal to discriminate against an employee based on their political affiliation. “Only a handful of states expressly state that employers are not allowed to discriminate based on an employee’s political views,” says Wilson. “And only two states make it illegal to discriminate against an employee’s ‘lawful conduct outside of work.’”

Continue reading

313,000 Jobs Added in February, But What Does that Mean for the Average American?


Employment trends expert breaks down the numbers from Friday’s jobs report

After a pleasantly shocking jobs report on Friday, employment experts are now saying that the United States is at ‘full employment.’ But, what does this mean for Americans, and are the numbers really as good as they seem?

“February’s jobs report is a solid sign that our economy is getting stronger,” says Rob Wilson, president of Employco USA and employment trends expert. “Not only were 313,000 jobs added in a variety of low, middle, and high-wage industries, but we also saw an influx of hundreds of thousands of people rejoining the job market. This is huge news, as there had been fears that our workforce was depleted and that many Americans were simply opting to not seek employment.”

However, the employment expert explains that some people might be misled by the news that America is now at ‘full employment.’

“Full employment does not mean that every American has a job,” says Wilson. “Full employment is a term that economists use to describe optimal employment, when unemployment is at the lowest possible level without causing an unhealthy rebound of inflation in which employers have to compete too intensely for workers and bump up wages too quickly.”

In other words, our current economy is one that is optimal for both workers and employers.

Wilson says, “2018 is already off to an incredible start. We have added an average of 276,000 jobs a month, compared to 182,000 in 2017, and this growth shows no signs of stopping.”

For more on this topic, please contact Rob Wilson at

New Study Warns: Young Female Employees Are the Biggest Targets for Workplace Bullies

Human resources expert explains how victims should confront workplace bullying

Workplace bullying is a sadly common issue that many employees face on a regular basis. And, some employees are at higher risk of workplace bullying than others. A recent online study led by James Cook University in Australia found that these risks for bullying include being young as well as being a woman.

“The researchers discovered that female employees are at a higher risk of being bullied, and the same is true for younger employees,” said Rob Wilson, human resources expert and President of Employco USA. “Sadly, simply for the ‘crime’ of being a woman or being young in the workplace can increase your risk of harassment while on the job.”

Other recent research bears out these findings, including a recent study performed by the University of Arizona which showed that female employees are targeted more with rude remarks and unkind behavior than male employees.

So how should employees address these situations and defuse workplace bullying?

“First, you need to change your thinking,” says Wilson, “It’s not your job to make a bully leave you alone. Your only job is to show up and perform the duties for which your boss hired you. While being firm and clear about your boundaries can help stop a bully, ultimately, some people are going to behave badly no matter what you do.”

So, Wilson says, go to H.R.—if you are fortunate enough to work for a company which is large enough to have one. “If that’s not a possibility, then go to someone in management whom you trust, whether it’s your company president or the person who helped mentor you when you first joined the firm.”

Some companies, such as those companies for which Employco offers support, have a firm which helps to handle H.R. issues, and in these cases there might be a 1-800 number which you can call.

“I find that our clients’ employees feel much more comfortable coming to us about bullying and other office harassment, instead of speaking to someone in their own company,” says Wilson. “They feel safer and the conversation feels more private and less biased. Creating a safe atmosphere for people to come forward is one of the best ways to help prevent workplace bullying.”

For more on this topic, please contact Rob Wilson at